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Former U.S. Senator Byrd dies at 98 in Winchester home

By Web Staff, WDBJ7, news@wdbj7.com
Published On: Jul 30 2013 01:35:27 PM EDT
Updated On: Jul 30 2013 12:00:00 PM EDT

He was 98 and the oldest living former US Senator.

WINCHESTER, Va. -

America’s oldest living former senator, Harry F. Byrd, died Tuesday morning at his Winchester home. He was 98.

Byrd was born in Winchester. He attended Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia. He also served in World War II, in the Virginia Senate, and then represented Virginia by serving three terms in Washington in the U.S. Senate.

He also wrote columns in the Winchester Star and the Harrisonburg Daily-News-Record.

“Senator Byrd was an iconic figure in Virginia history. He lived through a century of immense change, both here at home and abroad, and he never sat on the sidelines. From his time in public office to his long career in journalism, Harry F. Byrd, Jr. was at the center of the great debates and policy discussions that marked our nation’s path forward,” Governor Bob McDonnell wrote in a news release.

McDonnell ordered all state flags to be flown at half-staff Friday and Saturday in Byrd’s honor

Here is the news release from Governor McDonnell's office:

Governor Bob McDonnell issued the following statement this morning regarding news that former Virginia Senator Harry F. Byrd, Jr., America’s oldest living former senator, has passed away at 98 at his home in Winchester. In addition, the governor has ordered all state flags to fly at half-staff Friday and Saturday in memory of the senator.

“This morning, Harry F. Byrd, Jr., America’s oldest living former senator, passed away at his home in Winchester. This is a sad day in the Commonwealth. A chapter of our history has concluded; we’ve lost a good and decent person and a dedicated public servant.

Senator Byrd was a son of the Valley. He was born in Winchester. While he would go on to attend school at VMI and UVa, serve our nation in World War II, represent the area in the State Senate, and then serve three terms in Washington as a United States Senator, it was always true that in spirit and in soul, Harry F. Byrd, Jr. never left the Valley that he loved.

Senator Byrd was an iconic figure in Virginia history. He lived through a century of immense change, both here at home and abroad, and he never sat on the sidelines. From his time in public office to his long career in journalism, Harry F. Byrd, Jr. was at the center of the great debates and policy discussions that marked our nation’s path forward. He made his mark as a strong fiscal conservative, always committed to ensuring that taxpayer dollars be wisely and conservatively utilized.

I had the great opportunity to visit with the senator several times over the past few years at his home. His mind was sharp, and he was quick with stories from growing up in Virginia’s Executive Mansion in the 1920’s to his experiences as the first person ever elected and re-elected to the United States Senate as an independent. The senator was rightly known for his civility, candor and wit, and those attributes remained with him until the very end. As governor, there were a number of times I would receive a carefully handwritten letter from the senator, well into his 90’s, letting me know how he felt about legislation and policy discussions in Richmond.

He lived to participate in the public discourse and he cherished democracy and civic engagement. That was the common thread that ran from his time in public office to his editorials and columns in The Winchester Star and The Harrisonburg Daily News-Record.

Virginia will mourn the passing of Senator Harry F. Byrd, Jr.”