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Mega Party causes some controversy in Giles County

By Orlando Salinas, osalinas@wdbj7.com
Published On: Jun 03 2014 08:04:49 PM EDT
Updated On: Jun 04 2014 07:27:45 AM EDT

Those getting ready to end the school year are going out with a bang, a mega party, but some parents in Giles County have a problem with this party

PEARISBURG, Va -

All day Tuesday, kids at Macy McClaugherty School in Pearisburg lined up to jump, slide and slap one other silly.

It was their "end of year" reward for selling hundreds of pounds of frozen cookie dough and raising money for their school.

One side of the school was covered in bounce houses and giant slides all day.

Principal Jared Rader said for nearly eight years, the school has had a "Mega Party" at the end of the session, celebrating the fundraising effort.

"Each year we set a yearly goal," Rader said. "Our goal is to raise funds to help support some of the things we do here around the school. We have students participate, we have parents participate."

But some parents don't like the idea of giving some kids more play time, simply because their parents sold more product.

Kristi Mignogna has three kids attending Macy and said the mega party is fair, even for kids who aren't good at sales.

"We sold cookie dough and the more you sell the more fun time we get and we're doing it for the one's who didn't make goal," Mignogna said. "Some [students] that didn't make one or two or don't (sell) 12 [containers of frozen cookie dough], so whoever didn't make it, we let them play."

At the start of the school year, Rader said students were encouraged to sell at least 12 containers of cookie dough each, that would earn them 90 minutes of mega party time, while selling under 12 containers would mean only 30 minutes of play time.

Rader added that regardless of how much dough a student sold or didn't sell, they still got free snow cones and play time too.

Rader said he was speaking from experience.

"We have two children here that I know of that one student gets to participate today for 30 minutes," Rader said. "One gets to participate for 90 minutes. I know those two children very well, because they're my own."