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Voters worried about the political system

By Nadia Singh, nsingh@wdbj7.com
Published On: Dec 24 2013 11:39:14 AM EST
Updated On: Oct 16 2013 11:49:18 PM EDT

We've been hearing from viewers through social media, email, and even phone calls.
Voters are worried and those we've heard from say they're losing their faith in the political system.

Even though a resolution has been reached, the damage from the government shutdown isn't going away overnight. Your Hometown News Leader spoke to voters and WDBJ7 political analyst Bob Denton about how the shutdown affected Virginia's upcoming governor's race.

We've been hearing from viewers through social media, email, and even phone calls. Voters are worried and those we've heard from say they're losing their faith in the political system.

"We're seeing some of the lowest interest as it relates to the governor's race than we've seen in recent history," WDBJ7 Political Analyst, Bob Denton said.

In fact, 40 percent of the vote may not even be reached in this election.

"Clearly voters are kind of put off by politics in general and not even focusing on this gubernatorial campaign," said Denton.

That's uncommon because history shows that the governor's race historically brings out anywhere from 40 to 50 percent of voters. But it's the government shutdown experts say has taken a toll on the political landscape.

"Voters are very angry across the nation and especially here in the commonwealth of Virginia, says Denton.
Voter Cathy Hempfield told WDBJ7, "People are getting frustrated and not wanting to vote but they should. They should continue to keep their mind on what's important, what the big issues are."

As a resolution draws closer, experts say the work to repair has only just begun.

"You're certainly going to see a lot of talk about trying to get through the holidays but then the next deadline. What are some of the issues to talk about as it relates to entitlement? What about aspects of Obamacare that can be revised? So you're going to start seeing a little bit more active negotiations."

But voter confidence remains low.

"They're fed up with the indecisiveness in Congress, the leadership up there, they appear they don't know what they're doing and we sent them there." says voter Bob Brumfield.